- ArtVerona

Beatrice Burati Anderson is pleased to invite you to ArtVerona #backtoitaly, Pavilion 12, Booth I1

Artworks

Uscita #7, Adagio - Pawel und Pavel

A TYPICAL SINE VAWE - Margherita Morgantin

Uscita #4 – Lista: letti nei quali ti ho desiderato / Exit #4 List: beds in which I desired you - Pawel und Pavel - HOPE!

Esplosioni - Anita Sieff

Baroque Tides - Andrew Huston

ARTISTS

Francesco Candeloro

Francesco Candeloro was born in 1974 in Venice, city where he studied and graduated from the Fine Arts Academy and in which he currently lives and works.
The artist places at the core of his very personal research the dimensions of light and colour, sign and shape, proportion, rhythm and movement and uses them as keys to deepen spatial and temporal dynamics. For Candeloro “art is a vision of the time”, vision which he translates through the transparencies of the coloured plexiglass, his elective and most congenial material, employed for the realization of the various types of artworks of his articulated production.

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Andrew Huston

Andrew Huston, born in the United Kingdom, is an American/Australian /British
artist. After 20 years in New York where he had a studio in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, he moved to Venice, Italy in June 2017 where he lives and works. Huston completed his bachelors’ degree at Parson School of Design in Paris, France and achieved his Masters in painting at Sydney College of Art in Sydney Australia.

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Margherita Morgantin

Margherita Morgantin was born in Venice in 1971; she graduated in Architecture at the I.U.A.V. Department of Technical Physics, studying methods of forecasting of natural light. She attended the Visual Arts course at the Ratti Foundation in Como in 2001. Her work is articulated in different languages ranging from drawing to performance. She has published a book of short texts and drawings: Titolo variabile, Quodlibet, Macerata 2009; Agenti autonomi e sistemi multiagente, with Michele Di Stefano, Quodlibet, 2012; Wittgenstein, disegni sulla certezza, Nottetempo 2016. She has participated in contemporary art exhibitions in Italy and abroad. She lives and works in Milan and teaches Anatomy at the Academy of Fine Arts in L’Aquila.

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Pawel und Pavel

Pawel und Pavel are possible and always variable alter egos of their authors, the name is inspired by the polish artist Pawel Althamer.
Pawel und Pavel define themselves as scenographers of the mind, and work with the aim of developing situations and strategies
for objects separated from their community context.
Pawel und Pavel work is essentially a minimal and not ephemeral collective performative practice.
Tropici, presented in Rome in November 2013 at the Angelo Mai altrove occupato, welcomed their first public appearance.

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Giovanni Rizzoli

Giovanni Rizzoli was born in Venice in 1963; after the primary and lower secondary school and the first year of classical studies in high school in Venice, he lived his adolescence between Canada and Switzerland, attending Stanstead College in Québec, and at the École Nouvelle de Chailly in Lausanne. Between 1984 and 1985 he attended the Sotheby’s Works of Art Course in London, and from 1985 to 1987 he followed courses, also in London, at the Architectural Association and at the same time, for a brief period, at City and Guilds. In 1988 he lived in New York, where he frequented some of the leading artists of the time, including Not Vital, Saint Clair Cemin, Salvatore Scarpitta and Louise Bourgeois. While in New York he also attended a course in traditional Japanese painting. After returning to Italy, in 1991 he graduated in the History of Medieval Art at the Università Ca’ Foscari of Venice. He taught at the New York University in its Venice and New York premises.

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Anita Sieff

Her investigation is on love as feeling to be discovered, as motivation to act and as the understanding of the implication which drives humanity in its process towards awareness. It is the going beyond the self to encounter the other, that creates relationship. The relationship is therefore seen as a common space, a kind of laboratory  where, without loosing our identity, we aspire to communion.

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